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Piers Morgan Tonight

News/Business. (2012)

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CNN

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01:00:00

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San Francisco, CA, USA

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Comcast Cable

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Virtual Ch. 759 (CNN HD)

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mpeg2video

AUDIO CODEC
ac3

PIXEL WIDTH
1920

PIXEL HEIGHT
1080

TOPIC FREQUENCY

America 22, China 9, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad 7, United States 6, Israel 5, Us 5, Iran 4, Obama 3, Romney 3, Bill Clinton 3, Wesley Clark 3, Paul Ryan 3, Deepak Chopra 3, Africa 3, Syria 3, Unitedhealthcare Insurance Company 2, Mark Mckay 2, Aarp 2, New York 2, Subaru 2,
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  CNN    Piers Morgan Tonight    News/Business.  (2012)  

    September 26, 2012
    9:00 - 10:00pm PDT  

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years like the last four years. we have to get the economy going again. >> campaigns go head to head. what the latest means. nate silver will be asked if romney can win and deepak chopra, wesley clark and ameerah al-taweel. things get lively at the clinton global initiative. >> you want to make farming sexy, don't you. >> furious talk from the angriest man in america, lewis black. >> the whole world coming here. you are screwing up the traffic. this is "piers morgan tonight." good evening. our big story tonight mahmoud ahmadinejad made his speech. the u.s. and canadian delegation stayed away. even so mahmoud ahmadinejad painted iran as the victim and
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to blame israel. ultramodern weaponry and pledge to disclose armaments in due time is now being used as a new language of threat against nations to crush them to to accepting a new era. continued threats by the uncivilized to resort military action against our great nation is a clear example of this bitter reality. >> crystal spent i'm in iran. his best selling book is "half the sky" turning oppression in to opportunity for women worldwide. it is a series on pbs and nick is joining me now. mahmoud ahmadinejad is a fascinating character. whatever you think of him, love him, loathe him he commands attention. oddly today he seemed to be on his best behavior. what do you read in to that?
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>> his speech was more reasonable this year, reasonable by mahmoud ahmadinejad's standards, not normal standards. after all, he suggested 9/11 was some kind of dark conspiracy and for him to accuse other countries of nuclear responsibility is a little bit rich. i think he has been under pressure at home frankly for his wackiness. a lot of iranians are embarrassed by the bad press he brings his country. he's almost at a time he will be out of office in a year from now. he is losing power within the country. i think he's a declining force. >> does the president of iran really have much power? >> it depends on the situation. the supreme leader the ayatollah is the person running the country. if the president has the supreme leader's confidence or if the supreme leader is ill then the president could. right now there's real tension between them and mahmoud
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ahmadinejad is marginalized both the supreme leader and vis-a-vis other critical fankss. >> if israel carries out with the increasingly high threat to take preemptive action against iran believing it is dwopg a nuclear weapon, what d should america's response be and does it depend on who wins the election? >> i think one thing israel is, or some people in israel are trying to do is to push the u.s. to kind of do it for them. the argument is that, look, if we end up with a strike on iranian nuclear sites that will start a larger war. and you are going to be involved any way. you may as well go in and you have the bunker busters. you can take out the centrifuges for example. so that is one possibility. we would be pushed in to it from the beginning. another possibility is iran would escalate late and widen it and we would be drawn in. i think it is one of the things i worry about in the period
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after the election. i don't think it is likely. it is possible absolutely. >> were you surprised or dismayed or both by president obama refusing to sit down with any world leaders this week? i was. i did think that was a missed opportunity. obviously he's concerned about the election. he's also our president. i think that just as he gets a little extra bang for the buck when he gives a speech opposed to romney giving it he has a responsibility to take this time, the u.n. general assembly once a year and meet a few more crucial leaders. i think that was unfortunate that he left the heavy lifting for hillary clinton. >> when i talked to mahmoud ahmadinejad he was keen to try to move on the game in the middle east by saying america's place is not to continue to get involved. you can already see he says a lot of difficulties are rising from intervention. let democracy, freedom, whatever you want to call it come organically through the people. very self serving to say this.
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the last thing he would allow in his own country. >> or syria. >> where he is almost certainly helping out his friend assad. >> i was amused in regards to syria, he said we are friends with both sides. >> on to that point, though, the america's place in all of this, the arab spring was terribly exciting and the american media covered it with great glee and said this is the future and it will be fantastic. reality kicked in. should america's intervention be reined back or is this time to get more involved? >> we were in a sense playing a puppet master role in the past when dictators were there. that role is no longer open to us. i don't think that we have an option of disengaging completely. we have huge interests there. on the other hand, i don't think we can play the traditional role. i think it will be bumpier, frankly, but i hope it isn't going to lead us to turn give up and turn away.
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>> they talked about the need to end sex trafficking and empowering women around the world. let's look at this. >> there are ten rooms in a brothel. shab by rooms essentially with just a bed. they lock from the outside. so a girl can be locked up inside and the customers brought to her. >> that was you raiding a brothel in cambodia. again, i suppose the obvious question, what should america be doing? what more can it do in places -- i'm mark mckay at a condition cnn center. according to nfl.com a deal has been reached between the national football league league and the union. according to nfl.com the league reached an agreement with the nfl referees association late wednesday to end the referee blockout.
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the national football league has yet to officially confirm the news. no word on when the regular referees could return to the field to play but their return can't come soon enough for so many. here's cnn's brian todd. >> reporter: if you think fans are mad about the nfl's replacement referees, try the players. the green bay packers who lost on a wild call at the end of the game with seattle apparently discussed drastic medss on the flight home. t.j. lang of the tweets said there is a potential plan. >> there is a conversation about is there anything that we could do to go on strike or not play games. go out and have an agreement to snap the ball and take a knee every play. >> the head of the national football league association says he doesn't think it is in the players or fans best interest to do that. no response from the nfl. rick doc walker a host for d.c. radio station espn 980 says a
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players' protest could backfire. >> you have to let it go or it will carry over to the next week. it is unfortunate what happened to green bay but it happened and it's over and you can't reverse it. >> reporter: no question the nfl has got on the the point of a public relations nightmare with the replacement refs that few if any anticipated and the overriding concern the safety of the players. some believe outright chaos has broken out on the field, cheap shots an coaches and players trying to intimidate replacement refs. walker works the sidelines during the games. >> they have lost control of the game. it looks like the '70s. it when i got in the league, quarterbacks could beat up a receiver all the way down the field. i watched philadelphia and baltimore, and it looked like an episode of "oz" out in the yard of a prisonen. >> reporter: jerry austin, a rules analyst for monday night football says the labor dispute
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has to be solved to get the focus back where it should be. >> what's everybody talking about? they are not talking about the game, they are talking about officiating. >> the talk may have given the locked out refugees leverage in negotiations but here's the nfl leverage, the tv ratings are stratospheric. the telecasts ranked one in two in viewership among all tv programs. nfl games topped the ratings in all 30 markets the first time it happened. brian todd, cnn, washington. tonight, according to nfl.com, a deal has been reached between the national football league and the nfl referees union to bring the regular re r back. it is a story we will continue to follow. >> it's not good enough anymore for romney to pick up undecided voters. he has to have something to
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happen to someone that says they are going to vote for obama like a crisis in europe. the most bullish sign for romney has been the stock market is getting jittery about spain and europe. that october surprise scenario could move the numbers, but romney's running out of time for routine things like the debates and the set pieces in the campaign. >> how important -- i mean president clinton told me last night that the debates will be crucial for romney. he could turn everything around. one great debate, in the first debate particularly. if he can taurnd the 47% fiasco, which has been a disaster because of the impression he gave, that he didn't understand who the 47% were. the arrogance that comes with being a wealthy, detached guy not caring about people who need help. what can he do in that debate? what would you recommend him to do? >> i think the 47% comments revealed he wasn't doing what 101 politics say you should do and play to the center.
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he has written off people that might have the median income and below. that's not a typical strategy. the text book strategy is can you find a way. the speech in ohio is an example of that where he is not touting an ideology saying i can be a reasonable competent manager and obama has not done enough on the economy. that was his message at first and he flailed around trying to find different approaches which is what you do when you are losing and get worried. frankly he should have stuck 0 the message he had all along instead of trying to pick paul ryan and play no, now we will have a discussion about the issues. >> what about mark coe rub bow, he would have brought something new. you get the sense of paul ryan he is another version of romney and that's not giving him a new era of voters coming in. >> the base didn't need paul ryan because they had balm and that was enough for the republican base to turn out to oust the president from office. >> fascinating stuff.
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i love the fact in your book there are two categories of hero, weather forecasters and gamble ers. >> what they have in common is they think of things in terms of probability. 20% chance of rain and might be frustrating because they are not giving you an exact answer and if you play poker, i made my living playing poker for a couple of years and you know that your opponent can have a miracle hand that will beat yours. >> and your prediction is storm clouds possible hurricane wiping him out. >> the metaphor drawing to an inside straight is not far off. a one in ten chance and if his polls look like this after the first debate that's where we will be at. we will look at a one in ten chance. real error in the polling or october surprise. he has a little window now but the thing is you lose time and if you want to switch to a sports analogy, right f obama leads by a touchdown, so to speak, in the first quarter it
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doesn't mean much. but we are in the fourth quarter and romney just maybe fumbled giving obama interception again. nothing impossible but you need a couple of good breaks. >> many predictions fail. nate silver, thank you. coming up, celebrity, power, success and the importance of helping others. my all-star panel at the clinton global initiative. [ male announcer ] every day, thousands of people are choosing advil®.
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clinton yesterday and sat down with my cgi panel. the saudi philanthropistens ameerah al-taweel, deepak chopra, recording artist will.i.am and retired general wesley clark. >> ameerah al-taweel, let me start with you. you come from saudi where you have been in the vanguard of promoting women's rights in a country not renowned for that over the last few centuries. how important is it to you to be doing this in saudi arabia? >> i think women's rights not only at the van guard of what we need to focus on in saudi arabia and also the region. the strongest form of empowering
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women in the region and more specifically saudi arabia is economic independence. once a woman is counting on herself, she will not put up with a lot of things that you see in the media. if you are talking about numbers, a lot of people focus about women and driving in saudi arabia. but not being able to drive has not stopped us from developing. 120 billion saudi reals in and 8 billion in investments are pumped by saudi women. all of these women work. all are passionate about what they do and driving has not stopped them. if anyone in the room really want to help, we women in the region, economic independence, i can never underline that the first thing to focus on. >> general clark, the middle east is of huge importance. i talked to president clinton
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about the ratcheting up of rhetoric between israel and rye iran and what that may do to the region if they had a conflict, what it would do to the global economy which is in a peril louse enough condition, as it s. what is your overview of the moment and is war likely or will common sense prevail do you think? >> i think common sense will prevail but i think it will be a tough slaug slog. in every state of the region you have external and internal dynamics. certainly that's the case in iran. they have to find a way to climb down from their quest for nuclear weapons. but throughout the region, there's a search for modernization, for jobs, for dignity, for self respect. they have to create political systems. they have freedom now and freedom of expression in many states that haven't had it before. and this imposes new responsibilities on ordinary citizens to set the right
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standards. there are unhappy people and people struggling in every country in the world, including america and we have to have a more sophisticated understanding of the region. we have a role to play there but these people are responsible for finding their own way forward. we with can help but they have to do it. >> i joined cnn on air last january. and the arab spring seemed to bring such excitement. now we're looking at a murkier picture, not quite sure what is going on in many countries. what can or should america do, if anything, to hasten or to change the current process? >> it should inspire hope, trust, stability and compassion. i think people look to america as a leader and if we can inspire hope, trust, stability and compassion with practical things like the princess said the economic empowerment of
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women. everyone knows in the united nations that is the fastest way to change the world in the direction of not only peace but social justice, economic justice, sustainability, health and well being. it's 50% of the population of our planet and they are disempowered for the most part. >> i was talking to the general and he was saying that the impact of having musicians come to this initiative here cannot be under estimated that you can get to these huge audiences that hang on your every word. i know you take that responsibility seriously. globalization is here and it's real and there is a sense, i think, for many americans we don't want to be the global policemen with the terrible toll and loss of life to our soldiers and economically. >> yeah, well, this transparent world that we live in now, america has to realize now we are part of the world. we are not leading the world. we do in some shape or form but
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when it comes to education we're not. we're dead last when it comes to education. as the world becomes more technological, 20 years from now, what is america when you didn't educate people to understand the technology we are relying upon. if you go to ghettos, i survived and escaped the ghetto, moved my whole family out. people in the ghetto have no clue of where we are going techno logically. and stem is the future. that's what we need to get 7-year-olds geared upon. we need to get them excited about stem. that's sustainability, as well. a different type of sustainability. it is educating people to walk in the world where they can contribute and participate in this global community year 2040. >> princess prosecute ameerah
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al-taweel the common thread is education that they couldn't have had before but there is no job at the end of the line for them. this creates resentment and frustration. so much so you have seen a lot of leaders being toppled and i'm sure there will be more to come. what is it that leader and countries need to adopt to stop this horrible cycle of a youth that feel disenfranchise and not able to feel their potential. >> economic development. when you have young people who have amazing ideas, entrepreneurial spirit. 60% of those jobs will be created through entrepreneurs. but you don't have banks that believe in them and people that support them and incubators and mentor to help lead for them. when you don't have the ecosystem to deal with this huge issue, add to that the governments that have fallen, the new structures, civil society, all of these issues at
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the same time, it's not going to be easy. it all takes action. we're taking action. we're starting an initiative called up for unity. it is not just job creation and helping entrepreneurs grow. it is more having ladders of opportunity. that's what opportunity is all about. we are working with partners and the clinton global initiative and we want to tap in to the resources, amazing platforms of partners around the world and create ladders of opportunity. we have an idea like the university which is interesting. >> this is a food university. mind you total utopia. you described it, i won't put the words in your mouth but you want to make farming sexy, don't you? >> i told them we want to make farming cool again. what's happening with farming is the average anch age of farmers is 60. can you imagine that? we are trying to bring cool back to farming through university. we are talking everything from
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the minute you plant a seed to the minute it is served on a plate. the whole supply chain and we are bringing people around the world. we want to have it in africa. because 60% -- we have 2 billion people coming in the next three decades. how are we egoing to feed them? 60% of amazing crops are stuck in africa and unused. we want to tap in to that. we want to have it in africa. we want to have it in the best way possible. it is all about technology, agriculture, making farming cool again. where young people come back to that field. we cannot afford to lose young people being interested in farming. >> particularly we want female drivers for the tractors. >> hopefully, yes. >> when we come back, i will ask my all-star cgi panel is america the world leader it should be? can the country do better? and speaking of all stars, look at the all-star audience, including barbara streisand. ♪
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a lot of big ideas from my all star panel. princess ameerah al-taweel and
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deepak chopra and wesley clark and will.i.am. >> your special interest is health and wellness than incredibly important. no point in having a population if they are not healthy and well. >> a scientist in -- monitor wellness in country and the well being of communities and nations. and if you want to go to gallup.com, you can check out the well being of the world in this moment. the united states is 13 at the moment. one is denmark, number two is canada. >> why are the daynes so healthy. >> because they have social security and not worried about health insurance. they are looked after and not greedy. they don't all want to become millionaires. >> here's what we found. this is very important. we classify people on a scale of
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one to 100. so if your score is over 70, you are thriving. if your score is 40 to 70 you are struggling and if it is less than 40 you are suffering. when a country starts to suffer, you are going to see revolution, social unrest, breakdown of leadership. we knew what was happening in libya. we knew what was going to happen in ton neez dwra. we knew what was going to happen in egypt and can predict what will happen in syria, just based on well being. it is the number one indicator. >> let's turn to your area here. there is a brilliant scene in a show that came out this year where jeff daniels who's the anchor man if you like goes on a rant at a college lecture about where america has been failing. he starts to list all of the areas in which america is painfully low on the global list of whether it is science,
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engineering, technology, whatever it may b. what has happened to the american dream that has allowed things to get so low in so many key area a's? why is the rest of the world overtaking and what should be done about it? >> i think it is priorities and values and greed. at the end of the day it is greed and lack of leadership to the point where i don't see why it makes sense that we spend so much money on prisons versus education. that doesn't make any sense to me at all. i don't see why we can't manufacturer things in america. i don't get it. >> general? >> i want to pitch in on manufacturing for a second. one thing we have with american manufacturing is we are an older manufacturing economy. we are used to paper orders and contract processes and other things if you go to china and look at a network like ali bab
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ba they have sourcing electronically. one thing we can do move is move to the internet age in our manufacturing in our bidding and ordering process. >> is china the enemy that many americans see it as, or should it be a global trading partner to mutual benefit? >> i think that we live in a very diverse world and we need to embrace that. if china is excelling in something. that's great. but guess what, america is excelling in technology, as well. i think that with china what we need to create, it is a bubble that could burst anytime, with ladders of opportunity people are stuck in factories for hours doing this same thing every day for years so creating ladders of opportunity and working with kompts so people can strive to have better job and better lives. i'm not against a certain country or nation excelling in something. i'm embracing that. >> but at the same time, unit
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countries are going to do what they do. but america has to figure out we are. we are our own enemy right now. somebody still hadn't told me why we spend so much money on prisons and not education. why did that slip over people's, one ear and out the others. >> prison is a better business. they are private enterprises. >> who said that was okay? just answer. >> i agree. who did say it was okay? >> who said guns were okay? who said droens were okay? who said economic injustice is okay? who says 50% of the world is living on $2 a day. 20% less than $1 a day. >> i travel the planet. one day in brazil and slovakia. i go to nuggets, kazakhstan. the majority of the people in
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prisons are latins and african-americans. >> that's true. >> from my community where i come from i have to bring stem to them to stimulate them to inspire them not to take that route. it doesn't have to be that way. it doesn't. it's an emergency right now. it is a national security issue. america, the department of defense needs educated americans around stem. if we are not educating them and the private sector said it is okay, prison is a big business but education isn't that is messed up. >> i want to comment on this. just to echo what will is saying i'm in favor of stem education. think of the high hool dropout in america. 28% of our young people in this country that aren't graduating. 28%. >> on education, america's big problem, it seems to me, the teachers aren't paid enough, not motivated or trained well enough. >> go to any college university campus and this is the cradle of
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innovation. this is where facebook came from, twitter, google, everything you can think of that is chapging the world came from apple, yahoo. >> yeah, yeah. >> it's coming from here. and you go, this is where the republicans need to address immigration policies. you go to a college campus and you will see people from korea, china, from asia, latin america. this is the country which everyone criticizes and yet wants to immigrate. next big names with big goals. i ask my cgi panel what they hope to achieve and how long it will take. ♪ ♪ hi dad. many years from now, when the subaru is theirs... hey. you missed a spot. ...i'll look back on this day and laugh.
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love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. and the candidate's speech is in pieces all over the district. the writer's desktop and the coordinator's phone are working on a joke with local color. the secure cloud just received a revised intro from the strategist's tablet. and while i make my way into the venue, the candidate will be rehearsing off of his phone. [ candidate ] and thanks to every young face i see out there. [ woman ] his phone is one of his biggest supporters. [ female announcer ] with cisco at the center... working together has never worked so well.
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you have in your own way areas you are pushing here and social media is an important part of that. why is the cgi now so important to so many people in your position? >> well, because of what you are seeing in front of you. you are seeing world leaders sitting next to an entrepreneurial, young entrepreneur, person who just start and ngo, same level talking about committing to something. that is what makes cgi special.
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you wouldn't see that in other platforms. you would see those in power sitting with those in power and disregarding those who are just starting and could be the next leaders of their own kauz cause. i see a lot of young people coming in with so much confidence and they want to talk about what they want to do and how you can be involved. >> your area, energy oil, talk to me about that and your relationship with cgi about that. >> we have to understand our responsibilities as global citizens. global warming, climate change it is a fact. we had the lowest ice pack at the end of the season in the arctic ocean ever. now they are maybe saying ice free in as early as 202. we have a responsibility. in the united states we are about the only educated country or oecd country that will argue that this isn't primarily a human problem. somehow, we have to take this
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take this political system and move it the right way. it's time for the united states, in this area, to lead. we didn't lead. we should have led. after kyoto, it is time right now, urgently for the united states to team with china and lead us forward, out of where we are in carbon and in to a new, responsibility as global citizens. >> united states doesn't have to go through a battle to lead the world. you are already leading. you have other leaders who are emerging out there, which is fine. this is a globalized world. so just embrace them. keep inspiring and keep doing what you are doing. believe in young people. believe in technology and science and have leaders like them lead the way. >> it's a marathon. it's a marathon, not a sprint. i'm 37. i've done all the things you can possibly do in music, and i never thought i would be able to do those things when i was in the ghetto.
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i never thought i would be in the grammys or play with michael jackson or the world cup or the super bowl. >> or most importantly this panel. >> no. i never thought that nasa would send a rocket to mars and when the rover lands the mars and beam the song back to planet earth to educate and inspire kids to take an interest in stem. i'm dedicating 20 years of my life to get these kids stimulated to create a new system in america, starting with my neighborhood boyer heights and turn these people in to entrepreneurs and innovators. >> good for you. >> we have a responsibility in america not just to inspire as individuals with our values but also to take our political system forward and continue to -- >> bringing things to the end by giving the lady the final word. >> if asked which president i
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would like to see re-elected? i said bill clinton. he's a true leader. he gathered all of us here today. you know, i just want to thank such inspiring leaders. you all believe in what you are doing and i think the more leaders we have in such fields the better the world will be. >> i spoke to bill clinton about the 22nd amendment that prohibits him from rupping again. a he wants it changed. he said it would be a good idea that you can have a break and come back. wonder who he is thinking of and i said if you can't do that we'd like to change our rules in britain and have you as our prime minister. which he relied, he can run for president of ireland or france because of his family background which i was amazed about. we may see the new french president in five years bill clinton. 00 la la. >> you have been a very captive audience. thank you to general clark, deepak chopra, will.i.am and
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ameerah al-taweel. >> coming up, a different take on the issues from the angriest man in america, louis black. the day that we say to the world of identity thieves "enough." we're lifelock, and we believe you have the right to live free from the fear of identity theft. our pledge to you? as long as there are identity thieves, we'll be there. we're lifelock. and we offer the most comprehensive identity theft protection ever created. lifelock: relentlessly protecting your identity. call 1-800-lifelock or go to lifelock.com today.
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lewis black is, let's face it, the angriest man in america. he has demonstrated more than once on his comedy specials and watch out he is about to unleash hell. returning to broadway with his show "running on empty." are you foaming at the mouth as usual. >> it is wonderful. now we only have 41 days to go right now, which is really the equivalent of -- it's 3 1/2 lightyears. it would be yeez ear if you say what it would feel like every day to listen to them all the time. the equivalent to getting to pluto. >> this has been going on, this election campaign since i joined cnn. i feel like i have visibly aged in the time they have got to make a decision. in britain we have a six-week with election campaign. here it is ten years. >> canada is short, everybody else. we like to make it the with kwif lent of ramadan and christmas.
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that's not even enough. it is like ten ramadans. it goes on. there's no reason for it n. in the end of it, the midst of the most beautiful time of the year, our summer, all we have left really, all we have left in the country is our summer, our time. it stays out later you think you are going to live forever and then these idiots show up to do a four-day pep rally. it's not right. >> shouldn't you be fasting or something. you are jewish and it is yom kippur. >> when you called, i called the rabbi and said piers has asked me to come on. can i please eat? as many jews aren't watching right now and would be upset i gave it up. i gave it up when i was very young. you go to temple and they play an opening song which is
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basically they took all of alfred hitchcock's music and made it one horrifying -- it's the freakiest -- it's just creepy. >> it can't be worse than the a catholic music i have to endure, the choral music. >> that is ♪ this is really, this is you are afraid bats will fly in. >> here's the weird thing. you have every world leader converging on new york and the only thing anyone is talking about is nfl football and this fail mary pass. >> sgle that's because now besides the summer now all we have left is the football. it's the only place for millions of americans, including myself to vent anger and be legitimized where you can sit and scream and yell anything -- you can yell i hate this. i don't like that. it doesn't even have to do with anything with the game. you can bellow like a lunatic. now it is -- it's one thing to
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watch your two teams go at it and then you add people who it is like substitute teachers. it is chaos. [ laughter ] it. >> is utter chaos. >> i find somebody that obviously prefers the real football, the round ball, i find it comical. the idea a multibillion dollar business can be wrecked by amateur referees over a dispute involving relative, like dimes, not even a big amount of money. >> it is extraordinary. what i love though is all of a sudden this whole thing -- the whole thing about the class warfare in the united states, all of a sudden the owners are now, everybody is screaming, left or right. the billion dollar owners can't pay. all of a sudden they are the only ones who have to kind of give up the money. give it up to those referees because it is sunday football. it is. it is final. you have to get through it.
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>> was it a touchdown. >> i don't think there was a touchdown. >> i can't let you go without talking to mahmoud ahmadinejad. he appears to be on a charm offensive this week. are you falling for him? >> i'm not falling for him but i think maybe his -- the one who's giving him his meds is finally found the right balance. you see these people. i have dated a lot of them. they are bipolar one say and obsessive compulsive the next and you watch them morph through their meds. he may have found his meds and all of the people in new york, the whole world coming here and what do new yorkers talk about, they are screwing up the traffic. those bastards. come to our city. what are they doing in there? they are talking? i have no time for it. >> i couldn't agree more. get your priorities.
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>> two quick plugs, running on empty, the richard rogers theater. tickets are still available and even more intriguing one slight hitch written by lewis blavp black october theened to 28th. you are a busy boy, lewis. thank you for sparing me the time. coming up, forget the fail mary in defense of replacements. yes, you heard me. when you take a closer look... ...at the best schools in the world... ...you see they all have something very interesting in common.
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outrage is building over the failed mary pass that led to the packers disputed loss if to the seahawks. you heard bill clinton last night telling it is time to end the strike of the nfl ref rhees but is it fair to blame the replacement refs. they are doing their best under extremely pressurized circumstances. take a look at this for example from our green bay affiliate nbc 26. >> 200 degrees below today. and it's really going to heat up. it will be like 346 degrees. >> get out of here. >> what is going on? >> poor guy. so easy to get the weather wrong with. even by 300 degrees.
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give the replacements a break. you may never know if you need one even if they can't be entirely trusted. >> that's it for us tonight. tomorrow night, the annoying brit twit will be bk on the air. they never give me an opportunity to talk to anybody but myself. even when he's sitting here. stay tuned. for now, it's "anderson cooper 360." i'm mark mckay at cnn center. the national football league has reached an agreement with the nfl referees association. the end came wednesday night. the end of the lockout effectively replacing the replacement referees. national football league commissioner roger goodell says the regular referees will be on the field to play starting with thursday night's game. the nfl commissioner saying, quote, we appreciate the commitments of the nfl ra and working through the issues to reach this important agreement.